COMAH and Hazardous Substances Legislation

Decision 2014/895/EU establishing the format for communicating the information referred to in Directive 2012/18/EU on the control of major-accident hazards involving dangerous substancesDecision 2014/896/EU establishing the format for communicating information from Member States on the implementation of Directive 2012/18/EU on the control of major-accident hazards involving dangerous substances This Decision establishes a format for communicating information on the implementation of Directive 2012/18/EU on the control of major-accident hazards involving dangerous substances, in Member States.
EC Directive 2012/18/EU on control of major-accident hazards involving dangerous substances (COMAH Directive:Seveso III) This Directive, which entered into force on 4 July 2012, sets out rules for the prevention of major accidents which involve dangerous substances and for reducing their consequences to humans and the natural environment. It is anticipated this will bring about a high level of protection throughout the EU. This Directive will revoke and replace Directive 96/82/EC, on major accident hazards, on 1 June 2015.
EC Directive 2013/30/EC on safety of offshore oil and gas operations The 2013 Directive came into force on 12 June 2013, amending Directive 2004/35/EC (on environmental liability with regards to the prevention and remedying of environmental damage). The 2013 Directive was introduced by the EU to put in place a set of rules to help prevent accidents, as well as respond promptly and effectively should they occur.
EC Directive 96/82/EC on the control of major-accident hazards involving dangerous substances (Seveso II Directive) This Directive, which entered into force on 3 February 1997, is aimed at the prevention of major accidents which involve dangerous substances and the limitation of their consequences for man and the environment, with a view to ensuring protection throughout the Community in a consistent and effective manner. These Regulations were amended by EU 2012/18 and will be transposed into The Control of Major Accident Hazards Regulations 2015.
EU Commission Implementing Regulation 1112/2014 A new direct acting EU Regulation (Implementation Regulation) for the reporting of incidents offshore came into effect 19th July 2015. The Regulations determine a common format for the sharing of information on major hazard indicators by operators and owners of offshore oil and gas installations, and a common format for the publication of information on major hazard indicators by the Member States. The Regulations require operators and owners of offshore installations, and well operators, to report incidents to the Offshore Safety Directive Regulator (OSDR).
Regulation (EU) 1078/2014 amending Annex 1 to Regulation (EU) 649/2012 on the export and import of hazardous chemicals  This Regulation amends Regulation (EU) 649/2012 on the export and import of hazardous chemicals. These amendments make changes to Annex 1 of Regulation (EU) 649/2012 including adding, replacing and deleting entries in the lists of chemicals subject to certain procedure or notification. These Regulations came into force on 1 December 2014.
Chemical (Hazard Identification and Packaging for Supply) Regulations 1994 as amended (CHIP) These regulations, which entered into force on 31 January 1995, require that chemical substances and preparations, which are dangerous for supply, as defined by CHIP be classified. This can either be as part of the Health and Safety Executives (HSE’s) “Approved List” or based on available data. The regulations also require that dangerous chemicals carry special warning symbols and safety data sheets. From 1 June 2015, this Directive will be fully withdrawn and will no longer have any legal effect.
Control of Major Accident Hazards Regulation (Northern Ireland) 2000 as amended The Control of Major Accident Hazards Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2000 implement the Seveso II Directive in Northern Ireland (only). The Regulations require the operators of prescribed major hazard sites ‘take all measures necessary to prevent major accidents and to limit their consequences for man and the environment’. The 2000 Regulations came in to force on 1 May 2000, and have since been amended twice, once in 2005 and again in 2014.  The latest amendment came into force on the  7 April 2014.
Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 2002 (COSHH) Requires employers to control exposures to hazardous substances to protect both employees and others who may be exposed from work activities. COSHH came into force on 21 November 2002.
Controls on Dangerous Substances and preparations (amendment) Regulations 2007 Cited as the Controls on Dangerous Substances and Preparations (Amendment) Regulations 2007, these Regulations came into force on 30 June 2007.
DRAFT: The Offshore Installations (Offshore Safety Directive) (Safety Case etc) Regulations 2015: Guidance on Regulations. Draft guidance published in July 2015 on the Offshore Installations (Offshore Safety Directive) (Safety Case etc) Regulations 2015.
Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 The Health and Safety at Work, etc. Act 1974 is the primary piece of legislation covering occupational health and safety in Great Britain. The Bill came into force later that year.
Planning (Control of Major Accident Hazards) (Scotland) Regulations 2000 (SI 2000/179) These Regulations may be cited as the Planning (Control of Major-Accident Hazards) (Scotland) Regulations 2000 and came into force on 6 July 2000.
Planning (Hazardous Substances) (No.2) (Amendment) Regulations (Northern Ireland) SR 2016/116 Applying to Northern Ireland only, these Regulations came into force on 9 May 2016 and amend the Planning (Hazardous Substances) (No. 2) Regulations (Northern Ireland) SR 2015/344 in order to specify that Defra must be consulted before an application for hazardous substance consent is determined.
Planning (Hazardous Substances) Wales Regulations 2015 These Regulations came into force on 4 September 2015 and apply to Wales only.
They consolidate along with amendments, the Planning (Hazardous Substances) Regulations SI 1992/656, and include provisions for the determination period of procedures relating to applications to the Secretary of State and appeals against decisions under the Planning (Hazardous Substances) Act 1990.
These Regulations also implement the land-use aspects of Directive 2012/18/EU on the control of major-accident hazards involving dangerous substances.
Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 2013 (RIDDOR) Requires the reporting of work related accidents, diseases and dangerous occurrences. It applies to all work activities but not to all incidents. These Regulations came into force on 1 October 2013.
The Chemicals (Hazard Information and Packaging for Supply) (Amendment) Regulations 2008 Cited as “CHIP 2008 Amendment Regulations”, which entered into force on 1 October 2008, amends the Control of Major Accident Hazards Regulations 1999 to provide for the Health and Safety Executive to be the enforcing authority except in the circumstance provided for. These regulations set out the planning requirements for operators of establishments where dangerous substances under COMAH 1999 are present. From 1 June 2015, this Directive will be fully withdrawn and will no longer have any legal effect.
The Control of Major Accident Hazards (Amendment) Regulations 2015 These Regulations came into force on 13 July 2015 and apply to England, Scotland and Wales. They correct an error in the text of the Control of Major Accident Hazards Regulations 2015.
The Control of Major Accident Hazards Regulations 2015 The new Control of Major Accident Hazards (COMAH) Regulations came into force in the UK on 1 June 2015. The main COMAH requirements will not change but a number of important changes particularly on how dangerous substances are classified and information that has to be made available to the public will change as a result of the new regulations. For the first time, lower tier operators will have to provide public information about their site and its hazards. Both top tier (now referred to as upper tier) and lower tier operators will need to provide public information electronically and keep it up to date.
The Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 2002 (as amended) The Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) Regulations 2002 are a health and safety regulations that are applicable to the environment with regards to chemical storage. COSHH is the law that requires employers to control substances that are hazardous to health. The COSHH Regulations 2002 came into force on 21 November 2002 and have since been amended in 2004, coming into force on 6 April 2005.
The Controls on Dangerous Substances and Preparations Regulations 2006 The Controls on Dangerous Substances and Preparations Regulations 2006 came into force on 7 January 2007 and address the UK’s responsibilities under the Marketing and Use Directive (76/79/EEC). This Directive which is used for placing restrictions on the marketing and use of specific hazardous chemicals.
The Offshore Installations (Offshore Safety Directive) (Safety Case, etc.) Regulations 2015 The Offshore Installation (Offshore Safety Directive) (Safety Case etc.) Regulations 2015 came into force on the 19 July 2015 replacing the 2005 Safety Case Regulations. The 2015 Regulations will implement the EC Directive on safety of offshore oil and gas operations 2013/30/EU. The EU has put Directive in place a set of rules to help prevent accidents, as well as respond promptly and efficiency should one occur. The 2015 Regulations provide for the preparation of safety cases for offshore installations and the notification of specified activities to the competent authority.
The Offshore Petroleum Licensing (Offshore Safety Directive) Regulations 2015 They implement Directive 2013/30/EU, on safety of offshore oil and gas operations, and make provisions regarding offshore licenses and came into force on 19 July 2015. The Regulations implement the Offshore Safety Directives requirements relating to licensing and certain environmental matters relating to emergency response, and are produced by DECC.
The Planning (Control of Major Accident Hazards) (Scotland) Regulations 2000 The Planning (Control of Major-Accident Hazards) (Scotland) Regulations 2000 came into force on 6 July 2000.
The Planning (Control of Major Accident Hazards) (Scotland) Regulations 2009 These Regulations may be cited as the Planning (Control of Major–Accident Hazards) (Scotland) Regulations 2009 and come into force on 23 November 2009.
The Planning (Hazardous Substances) Act 1990 Under these Regulations, if a site contains a hazardous substance on or under land above a specified quantity, then it is necessary to obtain consent from the hazardous substances authority. This Act came fully into force on 1 June 1992 and applies to England and Wales only.
The Planning (Hazardous Substances) (Amendment) (England) Regulations 2009 These Regulations amend the Planning (Hazardous Substances) Regulations 1992 by increasing the range and amount of dangerous substances for which consent must be obtained for storage or processing and came into force on 1 October 2009. The purpose of the legislation is to prevent major accidents which involve dangerous substances and to limit their consequences for man and the environment. It does this by ensuring that there appropriate distances between establishments storing and processing dangerous substances and residential/public buildings.
The Planning (Hazardous Substances) (Amendment) (Wales) Regulations 2010 The Regulations implement, in relation to town and country planning in Wales, controls of major accident hazards involving dangerous substances and  they came into force on 19 March 2010, amending the  Planning (Hazardous Substances) Regulations 1992.
The Planning (Hazardous Substances) Regulations 2015 These Regulations (2015/627) which apply to England only amend planning procedures in relation to sites where hazardous substances are held and land near those sites. The amendments are required in order to implement the land-use planning aspects of Directive 2012/18/EU on the control of major-accident hazards involving dangerous substances. These regulations also revoke The Planning (Hazardous Substances) Regulations 1992 and The Planning (Control of Major-Accident Hazards) Regulations 1999, and came into force on 1 June 2015.
The Planning (Hazardous Substances) Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2015 The Planning (Hazardous Substances) Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2015 revoke the 1993 Regulations with the same name. The 2015 Regulations came in to force on 1 April 2015, and apply only to Northern Ireland.  The Regulations were implement aspects of Directive 2012/18/EU on the control of major-accident hazards involving dangerous substances.
The Planning (Hazardous Substances) (Scotland) Act 1997 An Act to consolidate certain enactments relating to special controls in respect of hazardous substances with amendments to give effect to recommendations of the Scottish Law Commission. The Act was introduced into Scottish law in 1997.
The Town and Country Planning (Hazardous Substances)(Scotland) Regulations 2015 These Regulations came into force on 1 June 2015 and apply to Scotland only. They consolidate the Town and Country Planning (Hazardous Substances) (Scotland) Regulations 1993 and subsequent amendments to those Regulations and make further amendments. They also implement the land-use planning aspects of Directive 2012/18/EU on the control of major-accident hazards involving dangerous substances.