Waste Legislation

Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal 1992 This Convention, which came into force in 1992, provides for the control and strict regulation of transboundary shipment of hazardous wastes in order to protect human health and the environment. Annex I of the Convention (which lists wastes to be controlled) includes waste oils, water/hydrocarbon mixes as well as a number of heavy metals, organic compounds, organohalogens and asbestos.
The main objectives of the Convention are to a) reduce transboundary movements of hazardous waste; b) to treat and dispose hazardous wastes and other wastes as close as possible to their source of generation; and c) to minimise the generation of hazardous wastes and other waste.
European Agreement Concerning the International Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Road (ADR) 1957 as amended The European Agreement concerning the International Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Road (ADR) was produced in Geneva on 30 September 1957 by the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe, and it entered into force on 29 January 1968. The Agreement itself has been amended numerous times, with the latest volume of being applicable from 1 January 2015.  The Agreement was introduced to increase the safety of international transport by road of dangerous goods.
MARPOL 73/78 Annex V – Prevention of Pollution by Garbage from Ships Prevention of pollution by garbage from ships (entered into force December 1998). Deals with the different types of garbage and specifies the distances from land and the manner in which they may be disposed of. The Annex also designates Special Areas (including the North Sea) where the disposal of any garbage is prohibited except food wastes. The dumping of plastics at sea is also prohibited by this Annex.
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Decision C(2001)107/FINAL Due to the annual volume and value of recoverable hazardous wastes the OECD is developing a ‘control system’ to promote and enhance environmentally sound management of waste. This work is viewed as necessary to continuously keep up to date and improve the regulatory framework put in place by the OECD on 14 June 2001. The development of a ‘global waste control system’ is ongoing. The OECD Decision creates a streamlined system for regulating movements of hazardous waste for recovery between OECD countries in accordance with the framework established by the Basel Convention. Export of hazardous wastes to non OECD members for disposal or recovery is prohibited. The OECD Decision has been revised since through several amendments. A guidance manual has been developed.
Amendment Directive 2013/2/EU The Amendment Directive defines packaging and provides clarification where the borderline of what is packaging and what is unclear. These amendments came into force in February 2013.
Commission Decision 2000/532/EEC as amended by Commission Decision 2001/118/EC and 2001/119/EC (European Waste Catalogue and Hazardous Waste List)Commission Decision 2000/532/EEC as amended by Commission Decision 2001/118/EC and 2001/119/EC (European Waste Catalogue and Hazardous Waste List) The European Waste Catalogue provides a list of definitions and codes for classifying wastes. This system provides a more precise method of identify the type of waste. Copies of the catalogue can be found at the following link, Consolidated Version of European Waste Catalogue – EA Website. The term ‘special waste’ is obsolete in England and Wales from July 2005 when the Hazardous Waste (England and Wales) Regulations and the List of Wastes (England) Regulations come into force introducing the hazardous waste regime and replacing the Special Waste Regulations. The Special Waste Regulations still apply in Scotland. The List of Waste Regulations 2005 (England) transpose the European Waste Catalogue (EWC) into domestic legislation. The term ‘European Waste Code’ has been replaced by ‘List of Waste’ (LOW). Industry uses a coding system for hazardous wastes and waste transfer notes, under the Duty of Care. However the list has more than 800 codes for all hazardous and non-hazardous waste and is difficult to use correctly. The EA therefore now uses LOW codes in permitting to specify wastes that facilities can accept under the terms of their waste management licences, PPC permits and in relation to exemptions. Guidance is available in Using the List of Wastes to Code Wastes. These Decisions came into force on 1 January 2002. From the 1 June 2015, the CLP Regulations (EC No. 1272/2008) take affect which will replace the current rules on classification, labelling and packaging of substances and mixtures, thus amending the above.
Commission Regulation (EC) No 1013/2006 on shipment of waste (as amended) These Regulations came into force on the 14 June 2006.  The Regulations cover shipment of waste procedures for the transboundary shipments (i.e. transport) of waste. The Regulation includes a ban on the export of hazardous wastes to non-OECD countries as well as a ban on the export of waste for disposal.  The Regulation has since been amended (26 May 2014).
Commission Regulation (EU) No 1234/2014 amending Annexes IIIB, V and VIII to Regulation (EC) No 1013/2006 of the European Parliament and of the Council on shipments of waste Commission Regulation (EU) No 1234/2014 of 18 November 2014; amending Annexes IIIB, V and VIII to Regulation (EC) No 1013/2006 of the European Parliament and of the Council on shipments of waste. This Regulation shall apply from 26 May 2014.
Convention on Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Waste and their Disposal 1989 These Regulations require the operator of the landfill site to inspect the waste on receipt and satisfy himself that the waste conforms to the description provided in the transfer documentation. If waste does not conform to the description, the waste consignment will be refused. The waste description must conform to the European Waste Catalogue definitions. This came into force in 1992.
Council Decision 2003/33/EC establishing criteria and procedures for the acceptance of waste at landfills This Decision establishes the criteria and procedures needing to be adhered for the acceptance of waste at landfills; in accordance with the principles laid down in Directive 1999/31/EC, in particular Annex II. This Council Decision came into effect on 16 July 2004.
Council Directive 2011/97/EU amending Directive 1999/31/EC The 2011/97/EU Directive amends the 1999 EU Directive on the landfill of waste, with regards to specific criteria for the storage of metallic mercury considered as waste.  The Directive came into force on the 5 December 2011.
Council Directive on Hazardous Waste 91/689/EEC as amended These Regulations require the operator of the landfill site to inspect the waste on receipt and satisfy himself that the waste conforms to the description provided in the transfer documentation. If waste does not conform to the description, the waste consignment will be refused. The waste description must conform to the European Waste Catalogue definitions. This came into force on 12 December 1993.  The Directive has been amended a number of times, with the latest amendment coming from the EC Directive 2008/98/EC on the 19 November 2008.
Council Directive on the Disposal of Waste Oil (as amended) 75/489/EEC These Regulations require the operator of the landfill site to inspect the waste on receipt and satisfy himself that the waste conforms to the description provided in the transfer documentation. If waste does not conform to the description, the waste consignment will be refused. The waste description must conform to the European Waste Catalogue definitions. This Directive came into force on 25 July 1975.
Council Directive on the Incineration of Hazardous Waste 94/67/EC These Regulations require the operator of the landfill site to inspect the waste on receipt and satisfy himself that the waste conforms to the description provided in the transfer documentation. If waste does not conform to the description, the waste consignment will be refused. The waste description must conform to the European Waste Catalogue definitions. This came into force in early 1995.
Council Directive on the Protection of Groundwater Against Pollution Caused by certain Dangerous Substances 80/68/EEC as amended These Regulations require the operator of the landfill site to inspect the waste on receipt and satisfy himself that the waste conforms to the description provided in the transfer documentation. If waste does not conform to the description, the waste consignment will be refused. The waste description must conform to the European Waste Catalogue definitions. This Directive came into force on 19 December 1979.  The Directive has been amended by Directive 91/692/EEC of 23 December 1991 standardizing and rationalizing reports on the implementation of certain Directives relating to the environment, further amended by Regulation 1882/2003/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 29 September 2003.
Council Directive on the Supervision and Control with the European Community of the Transfrontier Shipment of Hazardous Waste (84/631/EEC) These Regulations require the operator of the landfill site to inspect the waste on receipt and satisfy himself that the waste conforms to the description provided in the transfer documentation. If waste does not conform to the description, the waste consignment will be refused. The waste description must conform to the European Waste Catalogue definitions. Member States were required to implement measures necessary to comply with this Directive by 1 October 1985.
Council Regulation EEC/259/93 on the supervision and control of shipments of waste within, into and out of the European Community (as amended) The Regulation was applied on 9 May 1994; under these Regulations (the Waste Shipment Regulations) any person who imports, produces, carries, keeps, treats or disposes of controlled waste has a duty to take all reasonable steps to ensure that their waste is handled lawfully and safely. Due to the annual volume and value of recoverable hazardous wastes the OECD is developing a ‘control system’ to promote and enhance environmentally sound management of waste. This work is viewed as necessary to continuously keep up to date and improve the regulatory framework put in place by the OECD. The development of a ‘global waste control system’ is ongoing. The OECD Decision creates a streamlined system for regulating movements of hazardous waste for recovery between OECD countries in accordance with the framework established by the Basel Convention. Export of hazardous wastes to non OECD members for disposal or recovery is prohibited. The OECD Decision was revised in 2001, but the revised Decision is not yet fully in force.
Decision 2008/350/EC Decision 2008/350/EC covers the whole of the UK and provides guidance on permits exemptions and limits of certain hazardous wastes that can be stored on site. This Regulation of 2008 was replaced by Directive 2012/19/EU in July 2012.
Decision 2014/955/EU amending Decision 2000/532/EC on the list of waste pursuant to Directive 2008/98/EC This Decision amends Decision 2000/532/EC establishing a list of wastes (European Waste Catalogue).
Directive 2015/1127/EU amending Annex 2 to Directive 2008/98/EC on waste This Directive amends Directive 2008/98/EC on waste. Amendments are made to Annex 2 to Directive 2008/98/EC in order to add a climate correction factor to a formula for calculating energy efficiency contained in the footnotes to that Annex.
EC Directive 2012/19/EU on waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) This Directive came into force in July 2012. It revokes and replaces EC Directive 2002/96/EC of the same name. The Directive aims to reduce the amount of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) going to landfill by promoting reuse and recycling of such equipment. It builds upon the requirements of Directive 2002/96/EC, but imposes the following:

  • All electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) come under this Directive, though certain types of EEE will continue to be excluded from the scope of this Directive
  • The volume of EEE that Member States are required to collect and use increases
  • Retail shops with an EEE sales area of at least 400m2 are required to offer free take-back of very small WEEE
  • There are tighter requirements for shipping EEE to non-EU countries.

New UK Regulations for implementing the WEEE Directive entered into force on 1 January 2014.

EC Directive on the disposal of waste oils 75/439/EEC Directive 75/439/EEC on the disposal of waste oils (amended by Directive 87/101/EEC), was designed to create a harmonised system for the collection, treatment, storage and disposal of waste oils, i.e. oils collected from vehicles and engines. The Directive came into force on 18 June 1975 and was is repealed with effect on 12 December 2010.
EC Framework Directive 2008/98/EC on Waste The European Parliament introduced a new Directive, 2008/98/EC, on waste and repealing certain Directives. The Directive lays down measures to protect the environment and human health by preventing or reducing the adverse impacts of the generation and management of waste and by reducing overall impacts of resource use and improving efficiency of such use. The Directive came into force on 12 December 2008, and the deadline for transposition in by Member States was 12 December 2010.
EU Directive on packaging waste (94/62/EC) Requires responsible waste handling, disposal and recovery operations are employed that do not harm the environment. Emphasis on the reduction of packaging waste and the recycling and reuse of materials. Responsibility for waste rests with the waste producer and everyone who handles it right through to final disposal or reclamation. The Directive came into force on 31 December 1994.
EU Directive on the landfill of waste (99/31/EC) as amended This Directive, which came into force on 16 July 1999, aims to improve standards of landfill through setting specific requirements for the design, operation and aftercare of landfills and for the types of waste that can be accepted. The Directive aims to reduce the amount of biodegradable municipal waste sent to landfill. All landfill sites are to be classified as either hazardous, non hazardous or inert. Certain wastes will be banned from landfill sites over a number of years including liquids and explosives. These requirements are implemented in the UK through the: Landfill (England and Wales) Regulations 2002; Landfill (Scotland) Regulations 2003; and Landfill Tax Regulations 1996. These regulations empower HM Customs and Excise to levy a tax against the disposal of waste to landfill. Although operators of landfill sites are responsible for paying the tax, costs are passed on to those disposing of the waste. Two levels of tax are set a) inert or inactive waste and b) all other waste. Certain materials are exempt including dredged material from harbours, naturally occurring materials from mining or quarrying and waste from the clearance of historically contaminated land
Regulation (EU) No 660/2014 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 15 May 2014 amending Regulation (EC) No 1013/2006 on shipments of waste This Regulation establishes procedures and control regimes for the shipment of waste, based on origin, destination and route, as well as the type of waste and the treatment types. Application This Regulation applies to shipments of waste: • between Member States; • imported from third countries; • exported to third countries; • in transit. It does not however apply to: • the offloading of waste, including waste water and residues, generated by the normal operation of ships and offshore platforms; • waste generated on board vehicles, trains, aeroplanes and ships, until it is offloaded to be disposed of or recovered; • shipments of radioactive waste; • shipments which are subject to approval under Regulation (EC) 1774/2002, on animal by-products not intended for human consumption; • shipments of waste from the Antarctic; • imports of waste generated by armed forces, relief organisations or peacemaking or peacekeeping operations; • shipments of carbon dioxide for the purposes of geological storage in accordance with Directive 2009/31/EC, on the geological storage of carbon dioxide
Regulation (EU) 1357/2014 replacing Annex III to Directive 2008/98/EC on waste and repealing certain Directives This Regulation amends Directive 2008/98/EC, on waste, replacing Annex 3 to that Directive which lists properties of waste which render it hazardous.

 

Batteries and Accumulators (Placing on the Market) Regulations 2008 as amended These Regulations came into force on 26 September 2008 and add to the measures put in place to reduce the impact of waste products on the environment. They represent a big first step towards implementing the Batteries Directive as a whole. The Regulations cover requirements for labelling batteries to boost recycling, set limits for the content of certain chemicals in batteries and prevent the placing on the market of certain batteries. The also give the Secretary of State for Business responsibility for enforcement, including the power to obtain evidence if producers are believed to have infringed the regulations. The 2012 amendment entered into force on 31 May 2012 and adds `capacity labelling’ to the requirements batteries must comply with before being placed on the market.  The Regulations have been further amended by The Batteries and Accumulators (Placing on the Market) (Amendment) Regulations 2015, which comes into force on the 1 July 2015.  The 2015 amendments update the 2008 Regulations by removing the exemption for button cells containing up to 2% Mercury, by removing the exemption for power tools containing cadmium.
Controlled Waste (England and Wales) Regulations 2012 (as amended) These regulations define “Controlled Waste” for the purposes of EPA 90. Three categories of controlled waste are defined, i.e. household, industrial and commercial. Definition of Controlled Waste has been amended (see below) by the EU Framework Directive on Waste. All Special Waste/Hazardous Waste is Controlled Waste (see Waste Classification). The main exemptions to Controlled Waste are explosive and radioactive wastes. These Regulations entered into force on 6 April 2012.
Controlled Waste (Registration of Carriers and Seizure of Vehicles) Regulations 1991 These Regulations may be cited as the Controlled Waste (Registration of Carriers and Seizures of Vehicles) Regulations 1991 and came into force on 14 October 1991.
Controlled Waste Regulations 1992 (as amended) These regulations define “Controlled Waste” for the purposes of EPA 90 and entered into force on which came into force on 1 June 1992. Three categories of controlled waste are defined, i.e. household, industrial and commercial. Definition of Controlled Waste has been amended by the EU Framework Directive on Waste. All Special Waste/Hazardous Waste is Controlled Waste. The main exemptions to Controlled Waste are explosive and radioactive wastes. These Regulations currently apply to Scotland only, with the latest amendment coming into force on the 1 April 1993.
Control of Pollution (Amendment) Act 1989 (as amended) Control of Pollution (Amendment) Act 1989 (from July 1989), is the principal legislation which requires all carriers of controlled waste to be registered, making it a criminal offence for a person who is not a registered carrier to transport controlled waste to or from any place in Great Britain. SEPA/EA are required to establish and maintain a public register of carriers. Carriers are exempt from registration if they are carrying waste they have produced themselves, unless it is building or demolition waste.  The Act was fully entered into force on fully in force on 1 April 1992.
Directive 2015/2087/EU amending Annex II to Directive 2000/59/EC on port reception facilities for ship generated waste and cargo residues This Directive amends Directive 2000/59/EC, on port reception facilities for ship-generated waste and cargo residues, by replacing Annex II on the information required to be notified before port entry.
Environment Protection Act 1990 (EPA 90) The Environmental Protection Act 1990 is an Act that as of 2008 defines, within England and Wales and Scotland, the fundamental structure and authority for waste management and the control of emissions into the environment. The Act received Royal Assent on 1 November 1990. As of 1996, authorisation and enforcement became the responsibility of the Environment Agency the Scottish Environmental Protection Agency.This Act is divided into 8 parts. The legislation is being updated such that Part 1, which outlines the controls on certain industrial processes and requires that they are authorised under either an Integrated Pollution Control or Atmospheric Pollution Control regime, according to their potential impact on the environment, is being revoked and replaced by the Pollution Prevention and Control Act 1999.
Environmental Protection (Prescribed Processes and Substances) (Amendment) (Hazardous Waste Incineration) Regulations 1998 These Regulations require the operator of the landfill site to inspect the waste on receipt and satisfy himself that the waste conforms to the description provided in the transfer documentation. If waste does not conform to the description, the waste consignment will be refused. The waste description must conform to the European Waste Catalogue definitions. These Regulations entered into force on 13 April 1998.
Environment (Wales) Act 2016 Factsheet – Waste The Welsh Government has produced a factsheet, detailing The Environment (Wales) Act 2016 which introduces the new arrangements in relation to waste segregation and collection. Implementation of these the provisions in the Act is expected to be made after January 2017.Further details on the Environment (Wales) Act 2016, which received Royal Assent on 21st March 2016, can be viewed via this link. The Act aims to delivers the Welsh Government’s commitment to introduce new legislation for the environment, positioning Wales as a low carbon, green economy, capable of adapting rapidly to the impacts of climate change.
Hazardous Waste (England and Wales) (Amendment) Regulations 2009 These Regulations amend the Hazardous Waste (England and Wales) Regulations 2005 which entered into force on 16 July 2005.  The 2005 Regulations imposed procedures for Special Waste/Hazardous Waste that add to those already under the Duty of Care, including requirements for transportation and disposal within a strict documented framework (see Transfer of Special / Hazardous Waste). The Hazardous Waste (England and Wales) (Amendment) Regulations 2009 affect handlers of hazardous waste in England and Wales. The Regulations require hazardous waste producers to notify the Environment Agency before hazardous wastes can be removed from the premises. Certain low risk premises are exempted from the Regulations as long as they produce less than a specified amount of hazardous waste per annum. The qualifying limitation has risen from 200kg to 500kg. See also ‘Explanatory Note’. These Regulations entered into force on 6 April 2009.
Hazardous Waste (England and Wales) (Amendment) Regulations SI 2016/336 Cited as the Hazardous Waste (England and Wales) (Amendment) Regulations 2016, these Regulations entered into force on the 1 April 2016, and amend the Hazardous Waste (England and Wales) Regulations SI 2005/894, revoking the requirement that premises where hazardous waste is either produced or removed, must notify the Environment Agency.
Hazardous Waste (England and Wales) Regulations 2005 These Regulations impose procedures for Special Waste/Hazardous Waste that add to those already under the Duty of Care, including requirements for transportation and disposal within a strict documented framework (see Transfer of Special / Hazardous Waste). These Regulations were fully implemented and entered into force on 16 July 2005.
Hazardous Waste (Miscellaneous Amendments) (Wales) Regulations 2015 These Regulations came into force on 20 July 2015 and apply to Wales only. They revoke the List of Wastes (Wales) Regulations 2005 and amend various statutory instruments in order to apply Decision 2000/532/EC, which establishes a list of wastes (European Waste Catalogue). As a result, the European Waste Catalogue must now be used in Wales instead of the List of Wastes (Wales) Regulations to determine which wastes are hazardous.
Landfill (England and Wales) Regulations 2005 as amended These Regulations require the operator of the landfill site to inspect the waste on receipt and satisfy himself that the waste conforms to the description provided in the transfer documentation. If waste does not conform to the description, the waste consignment will be refused. The waste description must conform to the European Waste Catalogue definitions. These Regulations entered fully into force on 16 July 2005.
Landfill (Scotland) Regulations 2003 as amendedLandfill (England and Wales) Regulations 2002 as amended  These Regulations covering Scotland (11 April 2003) and England and Wales (entered forced on 31 August 2002) require operators of landfill sites to inspect the waste on receipt and satisfy himself that the waste conforms to the description provided in the transfer documentation. If waste does not conform to the description, the waste consignment will be refused.The waste description must conform to the European Waste Catalogue definitions (see below).
Landfill Tax (Materials removed from Water) Order 2007 This Order came into force on 30 October 2007. It exempts from landfill tax the disposal of material that has been removed from water and other material added to it so that it is not liquid waste.
Landfill Tax Regulations 1996 as amended These regulations empower HM Customs and Excise to levy a tax against the disposal of waste to landfill. Although operators of landfill sites are responsible for paying the tax, costs are passed on to those disposing of the waste. Two levels of tax are set a) inert or inactive waste and b) all other waste. Certain materials are exempt including dredged material from harbours, naturally occurring materials from mining or quarrying and waste from the clearance of historically contaminated land. These Regulations came into force on 1 August 1996. There have been a number of amendments to the regulations, the latest amendment, The Landfill Tax (Amendment) Regulations 2015, came into force on the 1 April 2015, and only apply to England, Wales and Northern Ireland (Scotland now covered by the Landfill Tax (Scotland) Act 2014).
Landfill Tax (Scotland) Act 2014 The Landfill Tax (Scotland) Act 2014 came into force on 21 January 2014, applying in Scotland only.  This new legislation gives Scotland the framework to collect and manage the Scottish Landfill Tax and to operate the Scottish Landfill Communities Fund.
Persistent Organic Pollutants Regulations 2007 POP Regulations are implemented under the global treaty – the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants. The regulations came into force in December 2007 and enforce provisions relating to disposal of stockpiles and waste management of pollutants such as pesticides and industrial chemicals; typically DDT/PCBs which persist in the environment and may bioaccumulate through the food chain.
Pollution Prevention and Control (Designation of Waste Directive) (England and Wales) Order SI 2016/398 This Order came into force on 16th March 2016, and applies to England and Wales.  It allows regulations to be made under the Pollution Prevention and Control Act 1999 which corresponds to any provisions of Directive 2008/98/EC on waste
Special Waste Amendment (Scotland) Regulations 2004 These Regulations now only apply in Scotland, and entered into force on 1 July 2004. These Regulations impose procedures for Special Waste that add to those already under the Duty of Care, including requirements for transportation and disposal within a strict documented framework. The Regulations provide a new definition of Special Waste in accordance with the EC Hazardous Waste Directive (91/689/EEC). The Hazardous Waste List has been expanded and refined and is now included in the European Waste Catalogue.
Technical Guidance WM3: Waste Classification This technical guidance explains how to assess if the waste displays a hazardous property and how to classify it, including the adoption of the Globally Harmonised System (GHS) with the new set of hazard pictograms.
The Carriage of Dangerous Goods and Use of Transportable Pressure Equipment Regulations 2009 as amended The Carriage of Dangerous Goods and Use of Transportable Pressure Equipment Regulations 2009 (as amended) apply the ADR UN agreement in Great Britain, applying to England, Wales and Scotland only.  The 2009 Regulations came in to force on the 1 July 2009, with an amendment to the Regulation taking place in 2011, which came in to force on the 24 October 2011.
The Carriage of Dangerous Goods and Use of Transportable Pressure Equipment Regulations 2010 (Northern Ireland) as amended The Carriage of Dangerous Goods and Use of Transportable Pressure Equipment Regulations 2010 (Northern Ireland) as amended, apply the ADR UN agreement in Northern Ireland only.  The 2010 Regulations came in to force on the 19 May 2010, with an amendment to the Regulation taking place in 2011, which came in to force on the 11 November 2011.
The Controlled Waste and Duty of Care Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2013 These Regulations came into force on the 30 November 2013. These Regulations revoke and replace the Controlled Waste Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2002. The 2013 Regulations classify waste as household waste, commercial waste or industrial waste for the purposes of Part 2 of the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997 and thus determining the meaning of ‘controlled waste’.
The Environmental Permitting (England and Wales) (Amendment) Regulations 2011 The Environmental Permitting Regulations (England and Wales) 2010 as amended by The Environmental Permitting (England and Wales) (Amendment) Regulations 2011 introduced new and revised standard rules and generic risk assessments concerning waste operations under the Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control Directive. Standard rules define how operators must carry out activities, for example by limiting the types of waste that can be brought onto a site. If an operator wishes to carry out an activity covered by standard rules they can apply for a standard permit. This will be quicker and easier than applying for a bespoke permit with a more detailed assessment. These Regulations entered into force in August 2011.
The Environmental Permitting (England and Wales) Regulations 2014 These Regulations come into force on the 1 January 2015 and apply to England only; amending the Environmental Permitting (England and Wales) Regulations to remove the registration requirements.
The Environmental Permitting Regulations (England and Wales) 2010 as amended The Environmental Permitting Regulations (England and Wales) of March 2010 as amended by The Environmental Permitting (England and Wales) (Amendment) Regulations 2011 introduced new and revised standard rules and generic risk assessments concerning waste operations under the Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control Directive. Standard rules define how operators must carry out activities, for example by limiting the types of waste that can be brought onto a site. If an operator wishes to carry out an activity covered by standard rules they can apply for a standard permit. This will be quicker and easier than applying for a bespoke permit with a more detailed assessment.
The Merchant Shipping and Fishing Vessels (Port Waste Reception Facilities) (Amendment) Regulations 2009 These Regulations, which entered into force on 16 May 2009, amend the Merchant Shipping and Fishing Vessels (Port Waste Reception Facilities) Regulations 2003 to include the requirement of the master of a ship to notify the harbour authority where he intends to deliver sewage, which has been generated on board ship, to waste reception facilities in port.
The Merchant Shipping (Prevention of Pollution by Sewage and Garbage from Ships) Regulations 2008 These Regulations cover articles 3, 4 and 5 of the Merchant Shipping (Prevention of Pollution by Sewage and Garbage) Order 2006(a), article 2 of the Merchant Shipping (Prevention of Pollution) (Law of the Sea Convention) Order 1996 and section 128(5), and (6) of the Merchant Shipping Act 1995 and implement both the revised Annex IV of MARPOL 73/78 – Regulations for the Prevention of Pollution by Sewage from Ships, and the Annex V of MARPOL 73/78 (including amendments) – Regulations for the Prevention of Pollution by Garbage from Ships. These Regulations came into force on 1 February 2009.  The Regulations require all ships in UK waters to have one of the following: a sewage treatment plant; a sewage commuting and disinfecting system, which includes temporary storage; and a holding tank for the retention of sewage, which has a visual indicator of the amount of contents.
The Pollution Prevention and Control (Industrial Emissions) Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2013 These Regulations implement Directive 2010/75/EU on industrial emissions.  The 2013 Regulations came into force on 20 June 2013 and apply to Northern Ireland only.  These Regulations provide a consolidated system of environmental permitting for Northern Ireland, and extend the range of activities that require an environmental permit, including Mercury waste.
The Pollution Prevention and Control (Scotland) Amendment Regulations 2014 The 2014 amendment is a update to the Pollution Prevention and Control (Scotland) Regulations 2012. The 2012 Regulations came into force on 7 January 2013, with the 2014 amendment coming into force on 30 October 2014, both applying to Scotland only. These Regulations provide a consolidated system of environmental permitting for Scotland, and extend the range of activities that require an environmental permit, including Mercury waste.
The Pollution Prevention and Control (Scotland) Regulations 2012 Establishes mechanisms to control pollution from any installation carrying out specified activities through permits, inspections and emission control. Covers the inclusion of best available techniques (BAT) and standard rules in permits. These regulations revoke previous PPC legislation and came into effect on the 7 January 2013.
The Producer Responsibility Obligations (Packaging Waste) Regulations 2007 as amended Requires responsible waste handling, disposal and recovery operations are employed that do not harm the environment. Emphasis on the reduction of packaging waste and the recycling and reuse of materials. Responsibility for waste rests with the waste producer and everyone who handles it right through to final disposal or reclamation. These Regulations implement Council Directive on Packaging and Packaging Waste 94/62/EC, which sets targets for member states for the recycling and recovery of packaging waste. The 2007 Regulations impose on exporters an obligation to be accredited by the appropriate Agency before they can issue a packaging waste export recovery note, as evidence of the export of the packaging waste specified for reprocessing outside the United Kingdom. These Regulations give the Environment Agency more discretion on what constitutes sound evidence that exported packaging waste will be reprocessed.  The 2007 Regulations came into force on the 16 March 2007, and have been amended each year since introduction to update recycling and recovery targets annually.
The Restriction of the Use of Certain Hazardous Substances in Electrical and Electronic Equipment Regulations 2012 The Restriction of the Use of Certain Hazardous Substances in Electrical and Electronic Equipment (RoHS) Regulations 2012 affect businesses and individuals that are involved with electrical and electronic equipment (EEE). This includes manufacturers, importers and distributors.  The regulations came into force on the 2 January 2013 and are enforced throughout the UK (England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland).
The Special Waste Regulations 1996 as amended These Regulations, which entered into force on 1 September 1996, now only apply in Scotland. These Regulations impose procedures for Special Waste that add to those already under the Duty of Care, including requirements for transportation and disposal within a strict documented framework. The Regulations provide a new definition of Special Waste in accordance with the EC Hazardous Waste Directive (91/689/EEC). The Hazardous Waste List has been expanded and refined and is now included in the European Waste Catalogue. A number of amendments have been made to the 1996 Regulations since in was introduced, the latest amendment came into force on the 11 March 2004.
The Transfrontier Shipment of Radioactive Waste and Spent Fuel Regulations 2008  These Regulations, which came into force on 25 December 2008, revoke and replace the Transfrontier Shipment of Radioactive Waste Regulations 1993. The Regulations extend the scope of the 1993 Regulations to include spent nuclear fuel for re-processing as well as shipments of radioactive waste.
The Transfrontier Shipment of Waste (Amendment) Regulations 2014 These Regulations, which entered into force on 1 May 2014, amend the Transfrontier Shipment of Waste Regulations 2007 on shipments of waste. The Regulations redefine the competent authorities and transfer certain competent authority responsibilities from the Secretary of State to the Environment Agency, Scottish Environment Protection Agency and Department of the Environment in Northern Ireland and from the Secretary of State and Environment Agency to the Natural Resources Body for Wales.
The Transfrontier Shipment of Waste Regulations 2007 These Regulations, which entered into force on 12 July 2007, tighten the regime for export of waste. Requires the UK to implement a waste management plan for addressing the despatch of waste from the UK. It creates an offence for shipping waste in breach of the requirements; all shipments must be managed in an ‘environmentally sound manner’ and without endangering human health.
The Waste Batteries and Accumulators Regulations 2009 The EU’s Directive on Batteries and Accumulators and Waste Batteries and Accumulators (2006/66/EC) aims to reduce the environmental impact of portable, automotive and industrial batteries by increasing recycling and ‘greening’ the supply chain that produces and distributes them. It applies to all types of batteries regardless of shape, volume, weight, material composition or use. The Waste Batteries and Accumulators Regulations 2009 came into force on 5 May 2009 which establish the legislative framework for the collection, treatment and recycling of waste batteries and accumulators in the UK. A key element requires persons placing batteries on the market to register as a producer of batteries, and report on waste batteries collected and sent for recycling. These regulations establish the scope of ‘producer responsibility’, requiring producers of batteries and accumulators to take responsibility for separately collecting and recycling batteries and accumulators once they become waste.
The Waste Batteries (Scotland) Regulations 2009 Regulations covering collecting, recycling and reprocessing portable batteries come into force on 1 February 2010. Business using portable batteries should check with their supplier if they are operating a take back scheme (unless they sell less than 32kg of batteries per year). Regulations banning the disposal of waste industrial batteries to landfill or by incineration come into force on 1 January 2010. From 1 January 2010 if you buy new industrial batteries, the battery producer will take back your waste batteries. The over-arching Battery Directive aims to improve the environmental performance of those involved in the life cycle of batteries, e.g. producer, distributors, end-users and waste operators. The regulations aim to protect the environment from hazardous compounds found in industrial and automotive batteries. It prohibits the disposal of untreated industrial and automotive batteries to landfill or by incineration. Operators are required to store batteries only on an impermeable surface and under weatherproof covering.Requirements for handling batteries will also see amendments to existing licenses granted under the Waste Licensing Regulations 1994 and existing permits granted under the Pollution Prevention and Control (Scotland) Regulations 2000.
The Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Regulations 2013/3113 These new regulations covering waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) update previous regulations to ensure compliance with the recast WEEE Directive 2012/19/EU and revoke the following regulations:

  • Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Regulations SI 2006/3289
  • Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (Amendment) Regulations SI 2007/3454
  • Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (Amendment) Regulations SI 2009/2957
  • Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (Amendment) (No.2) Regulations SI 2009/3216
  • Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (Amendment) Regulations SI 2010/1155

SI 2013/3113 came into force on the 1 January 2014. These regulations will come into full force in January 2019.

The Waste (England and Wales) (Amendment) Regulations 2014 The 2014 Regulations came into force on the 6 April 2014. The regulations make provisions for the recording of the transfer of controlled waste on alternative documentation, such as invoices, instead of waste transfer notes. It also makes other amendments relevant to the registration of waste carriers, brokers and dealers.
The Waste (England and Wales) Regulations 2011 as amended The Waste (England and Wales) Regulations 2011 (as amended) transpose Directive 2008/98/EC into national legislation and came into force on the 28 March 2011. The Waste (England and Wales) Regulations 2011 replaced the Environmental Protection (Duty of Care) Regulations 1991 and apply the Duty of Care requirements brought in by the Environmental Protection Act 1990.
The Waste Information (Scotland) Regulations 2010 The Waste Information (Scotland) Regulations 2010 came into force on the 10 January 2011, in Scotland only.  These Regulations require persons having control or management of undertakings to comply with any request made to them by SEPA for information relating to waste associated with that undertaking and which falls within the categories set out in the regulation.
The Waste Management Licensing (Scotland) Amendment Regulations 2016 Laid before the Scottish Parliament on 25th January 2016, these regulations enter into force on 30th May 2016
The Waste Management Licensing (Scotland) Regulations 2011 These Regulations came into forced on 27 March 2011 and consolidate the waste management licensing and exemption system currently contained in the Waste Management Licensing Regulations 1994 as amended. They also make certain changes to that system (including the introduction of new exemptions from the requirement for licensing and the adjustment of various existing exemptions) and contain provision for the purpose of implementing Directive 2008/98/EC on waste.
The Waste (Meaning of Hazardous Waste and European Waste Catalogue) (Miscellaneous Amendments) (Scotland) Regulations 2015 These Regulations came into force on the 8 June 2015 and apply to Scotland only. They amend various pieces of legislation, replacing the definitions of “European Waste Catalogue” and “Waste Framework Directive” and implementing amendments to EU legislation.
The Waste (Scotland) Regulations 2011 The 2011 Scotland Regulations make a number of amendments to a variety of Scottish waste legislation to transpose aspects of Directive 2008/98/EC on waste into Scottish law. These Regulations may be cited as the Waste (Scotland) Regulations 2011 and came into force on 27 March 2011. The Regulations allows the partial suspension, revocation, transfer and surrender of site licences, and allows licences held by the same person to be consolidated if they cover the same site or more than one mobile plant.
The Waste (Scotland) Regulations 2012 The 2012 Regulations may be cited as the Waste (Scotland) Regulations 2012, and came into force on 17 May 2012.  These Regulations provide for the collection, transport and treatment of dry recyclable waste and food waste, and for related matters. They implement re-use and recycling and bio-waste sections from Directive 2008/98/EC on waste , and generally make provision connected with the implementation of requirements under European Union waste management legislation.
Transfrontier Shipment of Waste (Amendment) Regulations 2008 Addresses prohibitions applying to export of certain wastes destined for recovery in non-OECD countries. These Regulations entered into force on 5 February 2008.
Transfrontier Shipment of Waste Regulations 2007 These regulations, which revoke the Transfrontier Shipment of Waste Regulations 1994, entered into force on 12 July 2007.  The regulations enforce Regulation (EC) No. 1013/2006 and of the Council on shipments of waste.
Waste and Emissions Trading Act 2003 This Act provides for the enforceability of penalties, including fixed financial penalties, in the current voluntary UK Emissions Trading Scheme 2002. Part 2 of the Waste and Emissions Trading Act 2003 amends Schedule 1 to the Pollution Prevention and Control Act 1999. The amendment provides for penalties in any future emissions trading schemes. The Waste and Emissions Trading Act was granted Royal Assent on 13 November 2003.
Waste Batteries and Accumulators (Amendment) Regulations SI 2015/1935Landfill (England and Wales) Regulations 2002 as amended Laid before Parliament on the 26th November 2015, these Regulations came into force on 1 January 2016 and apply to England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. The Regulations amend the Waste Batteries and Accumulators Regulations SI 2009/890, reducing the regulatory burdens on businesses and allow for an increased focus on the key aims of the Regulations in delivering key environmental benefits.
Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (Amendment) Regulations SI 2015/1968 Laid before Parliament on the 1st December 2015, these Regulations came into force on the 25th December 2015 and apply to England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland.
Waste Management Licensing (Northern Ireland) Regulations 2003 as amended The Waste Management Licensing (Northern Ireland) Regulations 2003 came into force on the 19 December 2003 implementing Directive 2008/98/EC on waste in Northern Ireland only. The 2003 Regulations have since been amended in 2011, which came into force on the 30 December 2011. The regulations cover applications for waste management licences, which authorise the deposit, disposal and treatment of controlled waste.
Waste Minimisation Act 1998  This enables local authorities to arrange for waste minimisation in their areas and can be cited as the Waste Minimisation Act 1998 from 19 November 1998. This Act does not extend to Northern Ireland.
Waste Management Licencing (Scotland) Amendment Regulations SSI 2016/40 Cited as the Waste Management Licensing (Scotland) Amendment Regulations 2016, these Regulations entered into force on the 30 March 2016 and make amendments to the Waste Management Licensing (Scotland) Regulations 2011 in the disposal of specific waste types (i.e. vehicle tyres).