Atmospherics Legislation 

Decision 2015/1534/EU on the position to be adopted on behalf of the European Union at the International Maritime Organization during the 68th session of the Marine Environment Protection Committee and the 95th session of the Maritime Safety Committee on the adoption of amendments to MARPOL, SOLAS and the 2009 Guidelines for exhaust gas cleaning systems. This Decision sets out adoption of amendments to MARPOL, SOLAS and the 2009 Guidelines for exhaust gas cleaning systems.
Geneva Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution 1979 and its protocols

The Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution has addressed some of the major environmental problems of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) region through scientific collaboration and policy negotiation since 1979. Signed in 1979 it entered into force in 1983. Since implementation, the Convention has been extended by eight protocols that identify specific measures to be taken by operators to cut their air emission pollutants.

The Protocol to Abate Acidification, Eutrophication and Ground level Ozone under this convention has been amended several times. The first amendments were accepted in the EU through Decision (EU) 2017/1757. The EU accepts another amendment to this protocol, proposed by the United States of America through Decision (EU) 2019/2207. This extends the timescale for this protocol from 2019 to 2024 to 2022 to 2030.

MARPOL 73/78 Annex VI – Prevention of Air Pollution from Ships Annex VI

Annex VI is concerned with the control of emissions of ozone depleting substances, NOx, SOx, and VOCs and require ships (including platforms and drilling rigs) to be issued with an International Air Pollution Certificate following survey. There are a number of exclusions and exemptions, which limits the applicability of Annex VI to offshore oil and gas operations. Note: MARPOL 73/78 also defines a ship to include “floating craft and fixed or floating platforms” and these are required where appropriate to comply with the requirements similar to those set out for vessels. Entered into force on 19 May 2005 and a revised Annex VI was adopted in October 2008 which entered into force on 1 July 2010. The amendments to MARPOL Annex VI Regulations for the prevention of air pollution from ships, which entered into force on 1 January 2013, add a new chapter 4 to Annex VI on Regulations on energy efficiency for ships to make mandatory the Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI), for new ships, and the Ship Energy Efficiency Management Plan (SEEMP) for all ships. The main changes to the MARPOL Annex VI will see a progressive reduction in sulphur oxide (SOx) emissions from ships. The limits applicable to Sulphur Emissions Control Areas (which the UK is part) have been reduced to 0.10%, which came into effect on the 1st January 2015. Amendments to Regulation 13 of Annex VI, which came into force on the 1 September 2015, provide for the Tier III NOx standards to be applied to a marine diesel engine that is installed on a ship constructed after 1 January 2016 and which operates in emission control areas. On 1 September 2015 amendments were made to Annex VI concerning the extension of the application of Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI).

During the Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC), 71st session 3-7 July 2017 , a number of further amendments occurred to MARPOL Annex VI. These included Amendments to designate the North Sea and the Baltic Sea as emission control areas (ECAs) for nitrogen oxides (NOX) under regulation 13 of MARPOL Annex VI. Both ECAs will take effect on 1 January 2021.

Montreal Protocol 1987

This Protocol which entered into force on 1 January 1989, required several EC Regulations to underpin the system to control and monitor use of Ozone Depleting Substances (ODS) and other greenhouse gases (see Ozone Depleting Substances Regulations 2015). On 1 January 2015 Regulation (EC) 842/2006 revoked by Regulation (EU) 517/2014 on fluorinated greenhouse gases. Regulation 517/2014 on fluorinated greenhouse gases, published on the 20 June 2014, aims to protect the environment by reducing emissions of fluorinated greenhouse gases. The Regulation includes new rules on the containment, use, recovery and destruction of fluorinated greenhouse gases, and on related support measures and sets out conditions for specific use of fluorinated greenhouse gases.

UN-ECE Protocol on Pollutant Release and Transfer Registers (PRTR)

As per EC Directive 93/389. The Protocol became international law binding its Parties on 8 October 2009. As of 7 January 2014, the Protocol has been ratified by 32 countries and the European Union.

United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change 1992 (Rio Convention) and its protocols (e.g. Kyoto Protocol) The UN Framework Convention on Climate Change of 1992, which entered into force on 21 March 1994, is an international agreement linked to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, which led to the Kyoto Protocol (1997) being adopted. The major feature of the Kyoto Protocol is that it sets binding targets for 37 industrialized countries and the European community for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. These amount to an average of five per cent against 1990 levels over the five-year period 2008-2012. The major distinction between the Protocol and the Convention is that while the Convention encouraged industrialised countries to stabilize GHG emissions, the Protocol commits them to do so.

For updated legislation following Brexit, please refer to the pdf document downloadable from the Home & News Page.

Clean Air Act 1993 The Clean Air Act 1993 has its origins in Acts of 1956 and 1968. The Act came into force on 27 May 1993 and gives affect to England, Wales and Scotland only.
Clean Air (Northern Ireland) Order 1981 The Clean Air (Northern Ireland) Order 1981 sets out controls on smoke, dust and fumes, including the introduction of smoke control areas. The order came into affect on10 February 1981 and gives affect to Northern Ireland only.
Climate Change Act 2008

The Act sets up a framework for the UK to achieve its long-term goals of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 and to ensure steps are taken towards adapting to the impact of climate change. The Climate Change Act 2008 received Royal Assent on 26 November 2008. This was further updated by the Climate Change (Scotland) Act 2009 which received Royal Assent on August 4, 2009. The Climate Change Act 2008 (Credit Limit) Order 2016 sets a limit on the net amount of carbon units that may be credited to the net UK carbon account for the 2018-2022 budgetary period of 55,000,000 carbon units.

The Climate Change Act 2008 (Credit Limit) Order 2021 sets the limit on the net amount of carbon units that can be credited to the net UK carbon account for the 2023 – 2027 budgetary period, which is also 55,000,000 carbon units.

In accordance with this act, the carbon budget for the periods between 2008 and 2037 have been set by the following:

The Climate Change Act 2008 requires reporting of targeted greenhouse gas emissions which are included in the carbon budget. These targeted greenhouse gas emissions include carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, hydrofluorocarbons, perfluorocarbons, and sulphur hexafluoride. Climate Change (Targeted Greenhouse Gases) Order 2023 adds Nitrogen trifluoride (NF3) to this list of targeted greenhouse gases.

Climate Change Act 2008 (2050 Target Amendment) Order 2019 This order came into force on 27 June 2019 and sets new emissions targets for the UK. It amends the previous emissions target in Climate Change Act 2008 to set a new emissions target for the UK which is to reach 100% lower emissions than the 1990 baseline by 2050.
Climate Change (Scotland) Act 2009 asp 12 This act outlines greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction targets for Scotland. These targets include 42% reduction in GHGs by 2020, and 80% reduction by 2050. This act also includes provisions for Scottish ministers to set annual GHG emission reduction targets, report on the progress towards these targets, and the strategies to be employed to help achieve GHG reduction targets.
The greenhouse gas emissions targets were amended by the Climate Change (Emissions Reduction Targets) (Scotland) Act 2019 asp 15 . This act sets a new target for Scotland to reach new-zero emissions by 2045. Interim targets now include reaching greenhouse gas emissions which are 56%, 75% and 90% lower than the 1990 baseline in 2020, 2030 and 2040, respectively. These regulations came into force through this regulation itself and through the Climate Change (Emissions Reduction Targets) (Scotland) Act 2019 (Commencement) Regulations 2020. This brought the entire legislation into force on 23 March 2020.The interim 2020 target was lowered from 56% to 48.5% in 2023 by the Climate Change (Scotland) Act 2009 (Interim Target) Amendment Regulations 2023. The 2030 interim target of 75% remains.
Energy Act 1976 Under this Act of November 1976, consent is required for natural gas to be disposed of by flaring or venting and this applies to all onshore hydrocarbon fields as well as offshore fields.
Environment Act (1995) The Environment Act (1995), published in July 1995, set the framework for the National Air Quality Strategy first published in 1997 and most recently updated in 2007.
The Air Quality (Scotland) Amendment Regulations 2016

These Regulations came into force on 1 April 2016 and apply to Scotland only. They amend the Air Quality (Scotland) Regulations SSI 2000/97 by:

  • Introducing a definition of PM2 5;
  • Setting PM2 5 substance air quality objectives; and
  • Detailing the period by which local authorities are to review the air quality within their areas.
The Air Quality Standards (Amendment) Regulations 2016

These Regulations apply to England only. They came into force on 31 December 2016. They amend the Air Quality Standards Regulations SI 2010/1001 in relation to current technical standards which improve the accuracy and reliability of how air quality is monitored.

The Air Quality Standards (Amendment) Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2017 These regulations update the Air Quality Standards (Northern Ireland) 2010.

The Air Quality Standards Regulations 2010

The Air Quality Regulations (Scotland) Regulations 2010

The Air Quality Regulations (Wales) Regulations 2010

The Air Quality Standards Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2010

The National Air Quality Strategy is implemented in the UK through the following Regulations:

  • The Air Quality Standards Regulations 2010;
  • The Air Quality Regulations (Wales) Regulations 2010;
  • The Air Quality Regulations (Scotland) Regulations 2010; and
  • The Air Quality Standards Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2010.

These regulations prescribe air quality objectives for a range of common air pollutants and set out the requirements for Local Authorities to follow in order to achieve these objectives.

The Building Regulations &c. (Amendment) Regulations 2016 These Regulations amend the Building Regulations 2010 and the Approved Documents apply in relation to building work carried out in England and also apply to building work on excepted energy buildings in Wales. In addition, the amendments to the Energy Performance of Buildings (England and Wales) Regulations 2012 and the Party Wall etc. Act 1996 apply in England and Wales. These Regulations come into force on 6th April 2016, except regulation 2(19)(b) which comes into force on 1st May 2016.
The Building (Energy Performance of Buildings) (Scotland) Amendment Regulations 2016 These Regulations entered into force on 13 March 2016 and amend the Building (Scotland) Regulations SSI 2004/406. Updating text relating to the inspection requirements of air-conditioning systems in buildings and nearly zero-energy buildings, necessary in implementing Directive 2010/31/EU, on the energy performance of buildings.
The Carbon Accounting (2013–2017 Budgetary Period) Regulations 2015 These regulations introduce a carbon accounting system which will be used to monitor compliance with the targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions introduced by the Climate Change Act 2008, covering the period between 2013 to 2017. The system is compatible with the existing EU ETS trading system. These came into force on 24th March 2015.
The Carbon Accounting Regulations 2009

These Regulations came into force on 31 May 2009 and apply to England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. They introduced the carbon accounting system that will be used to monitor compliance with the targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions introduced by Part 1 of the Climate Change Act 2008. These regulations were amended by the Carbon Accounting (Provision for 2018) Regulations 2020 which came into force on 28 February 2020. This amendment includes implementing a provision to account for credits and debits to the new UK carbon account.

These regulations were further amended by the Carbon Accounting (Provision for 2019) Regulations 2021 which came into force in March 2021. They place a duty on the Secretary of State to register the carbon units credited and debited from the net UK carbon account and also update the Carbon Accounting (Provision for 2018) Regulations 2020 to account for credits and debits to the UK carbon account for the operation of EU ETS and domestic aviation for the second year (2019) for the third carbon budget period (2018 -2022). It also requires that the Secretary of State cancel any purchased carbon units by the end of the third budgetary period in respect of 2019.

A further amendment was also made in 2022 by The Carbon Accounting (Provision for 2020) Regulations 2022 which updates the carbon accounting system requirements for 2020, (the third year of the carbon budget period between 2018 – 2022) used to monitor compliance with targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions introduced by the Climate Change Act 2008.  

The Carbon Accounting Scheme (Scotland) Regulations 2010

These regulations set up a scheme for carbon accounting to monitor compliance with the targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions which were initiated by the Climate Change (Annual Targets) (Scotland) Order 2010.These Regulations have been amended by:

The Community Emissions Trading Scheme (Allocation of Allowances for Payment) Regulations 2012 These Regulations came into force on 14 November 2012. They make provision in relation to the auction process for allocating Community tradable emissions allowances in the UK under the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS).
The Climate Change Agreements (Administration) (Amendment) Regulations 2014 These Regulations came into force on 28 November 2014 and apply to England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland; amending the Climate Change Agreements (Administration) Regulations SI 2012/1976.
The Climate Change (Nitrogen Balance Sheet) (Scotland) Regulations 2022

These Regulations came into force on 11 March 2022 and apply to Scotland only.

They are made in accordance with the Climate Change (Scotland) Act 2009 and establish a Scottish Nitrogen Balance Sheet, bringing together evidence relating to flows of nitrogen across Scotland. The Nitrogen Balance Sheet will incorporate all major nitrogen flows including those related to business and industrial process, energy, transport and waste management, in addition to agriculture, aquaculture and forestry.  This will enable the Scottish Government to track how efficiently nitrogen is used and will help to reach national climate change targets with regards to reducing nitrous oxide greenhouse gases.

The Emissions Performance Standard Regulations 2015 These regulations came into force in 2015 and implement the Energy Act 2013 to establish a monitoring and enforcement regime. The Emissions Performance Standard sets a limit of 540 g CO2 / kWh until 2044 on operators of fossil fuel plant consented on or after 18 February 2014. It places a duty on operators to submit an emissions limit notification to Environment Agency if a greenhouse gas emissions permit was issued or varied on or after 25 March 2015 and requires for an annual emissions notification if the CO2 emissions are reported via a verified Greenhouse Gas Emissions Report. These regulations were amended by the Emissions Performance Standard (Amendment) Regulations 2022 to update references that previously referred to legislation that implemented the EU Emissions Trading Scheme in the UK.
The Emissions Performance Standard Monitoring and Enforcement Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2016 These Regulations came into force on the 15th March 2016 and apply only to Northern Ireland. They apply the monitoring and enforcement arrangements for emission performance for Northern Ireland.
The Energy Performance of Buildings (Certificates and Inspections) Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2008 (as amended) This Regulation implements Directive 2009/91/EC in Northern Ireland only. The Regulations require the production of energy performance certificates when buildings are sold or rented, and sets out the requirements for the certificate. The 2008 regulations came into force on 30 June 2008, and have since been amended in 2009, 2013 and 2014. The amendments require the addition of technically feasible, cost effective recommendation in the Energy Performance Certificate. the latest amendment came into force on 25 February 2014.
The Energy Performance of Buildings (England and Wales) Regulations 2012 (as amended) These Regulations consolidate the Energy Performance of Buildings (Certificates and Inspections) (England and Wales) Regulations 2007 with subsequent amendments since the 2007 Regulations came into force. The Regulations require the production of energy performance certificates when buildings are sold or rented, and sets out the requirements for the certificate. The 2012 regulations came into force on 9 January 2013, and have since been amended in 2013 and 2015. The latest amendment came into force on 6 April 2015 and apply to England and Wales only.
The Energy Performance of Buildings (Scotland) Regulations 2008 (as amended) This Regulation implements Directive 2009/91/EC in Scotland only. The Regulations require the production of energy performance certificates when buildings are sold or rented, and sets out the requirements for the certificate. The 2008 regulations came into force on 4 January 2009, and have since been amended twice in 2012, and again in 2013. The amendments make it mandatory for buyers and tenants to be shown Energy Performance Certificates, as well as requiring further information to be included on the certificates. The latest amendment came into force on 27 January 2013.
The Energy Performance of Buildings (Scotland) Amendment Regulations 2015 Cited as the Energy Performance of Buildings (Scotland) Amendment Regulations 2015, these Regulations came into force on 19 December 2015 and amend the Energy Performance of Buildings (Scotland) Regulations SSI 2008/309.
The Energy Saving Opportunity Scheme Regulations 2014 The Energy Saving Opportunity Scheme (ESOS) is an energy assessment and energy saving scheme established by the ESOS Regulations 2014. The scheme applies to large undertakings and groups containing large undertakings in the UK. Guidance on who is required to comply, and how to comply with ESOS has been published by the Environment Agency.
The Environment (Wales) Act 2016 (Amendment of 2050 Emissions Target) Regulations 2021 This regulation amends the Environment (Wales) Act 2016 by amending the target for emissions reductions in Wales for 2050 from 80% lower than the baseline to 100% lower than the baseline. Accordingly, the Climate Change (Carbon Budgets) (Wales) Regulations SI 2018/1303 were amended by the Climate Change (Carbon Budgets) (Wales) (Amendment) Regulations 2021 to reduce the carbon budget from 23% lower than the 1990 baseline for the budgetary period from 2016 – 2020 to 37% lower than the 1990 baseline for 2021 – 2025. Similarly, the Climate Change (Interim Emissions Targets) (Wales) Regulations 2018 was amended by the Climate Change (Interim Emissions Targets) (Wales) (Amendment) Regulations 2021 to increase the 2030 and 2040 interim emissions targets to be 67% and 80% of the 1990 baseline, respectively.
The Environmental Permitting (England and Wales) (Amendment) Regulations 2015 The 2015 amendment regulation are the latest amendment to the original Environmental Permitting (England and Wales) Regulations 2010, which have been amended a number of times during this period. The regulations were amended to include the requirements of the industrial emissions directive. These regulations came into force on the 21 March 2015 and extend to England and Wales only. An England only amendment came into force on the 6 April 2015, the Environmental Permitting (England and Wales) (Amendment) (England) Regulations 2015, giving the Environment Agency the power to accept enforcement undertakings for non-compliance with certain offences under those Regulations. The Environmental Permitting regulations cover onshore air emission activities in England and Wales.
The Fluorinated Greenhouse Gases Regulations 2015 These regulations, which came into force on the 19 March 2015, implement the requirements of Regulation (EU) No 517/2014 of the European Parliament, revoking the Fluorinated Greenhouse Gas Regulations 2009. The regulations cover certification of equipment such as refrigeration and fire protection and fluorinated gas (f-gas) based solvents. Creates offences and penalties for not complying with recovery of f-gases legislation, labelling, qualifications and certificates required to work with products or equipment containing them. The Regulations ban the manufacture and use of certain F-Gases and provide a time period for these to be phased out.
The Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Kyoto Protocol Registry) Regulations 2021 This legislation came into force in May 2021 and establishes the UK’s Kyoto Protocol registry. The UK’s Kyoto Protocol will now be maintained separately from the EU’s.
The Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading Scheme Auctioning Regulations 2021

These regulations came into force on 22 April 2021. The regulations include provisions for the auctioning of emissions allowances to emit 1 tonne or carbon dioxide equivalent under the UK ETS. The regulations were made under the Finance Act 2020 which include provisions for regulations to be made for emissions allowances in exchange for payment.

These regulations include the rules covering auctions and secondary markets for emissions allowances. The Recognised Auction Platforms (Amendment and Miscellaneous Provisions) Regulations 2021 were produced alongside these regulations and create an oversight role for the Financial Conduct Authority within the UK ETS.

The Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading Scheme Auctioning Regulations 2021 were amended by The Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading Scheme Auctioning (Amendment) (No. 2) Regulations 2021 by correcting errors within the regulations.

The Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading Scheme (Amendment) and National Emissions Inventory (Amendment) Regulations 2014 The Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading Scheme (Amendment) and National Emissions Inventory (Amendment) Regulations 2014 come into force on 1 February 2015.
The Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading Scheme (Amendment) and National Emissions Inventory Regulations 2005 These regulations came into force on 13 Nov 2005 and apply to England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. They originally provided the Secretary of State power to carry out obligations under Decision 2004/280/EC which was repealed and revoked by Regulation (EU) 525/2013 . These powers have been transferred to the Environment Agency and Natural Resource Wales. These regulations also implement provisions regarding the UK emissions trading registry.
These regulations have been most recently amended by Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading Scheme and National Emissions Inventory (Amendment) Regulations 2013 and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading Scheme (Amendment) and National Emissions Inventory (Amendment) Regulations 2014.
The Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading Scheme Order 2020

These regulations establish the UK Greenhouse Gas ETS that will be effective from 1 January 2021. This order was amended by the Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading Scheme (Amendment) Order 2021 to amend the monitoring and reporting rules for process emissions and to implement other provisions for smaller installations. The Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading Scheme Order 2020 was further amended by the Greenhouse Gas Emissions Treading Scheme (Amendment) Order 2022 by adding provisions relating to non-compliance. The provisions include allowing inspection of premises to ensure compliance by an authorised person as well as the regulator, establishing an offence for intentionally obstructing those using their rights to enter a premises and establish a penalty for those who fail to comply with a notice to return allowances. It also implements a provision that when a permit is surrendered or revoked, the deficit of allowances from previous scheme years must be surrendered.

The Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading Scheme was further amended in 2022 by Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading Scheme (Amendment) (No. 2) Order 2022. This order excludes the 2020 COVID pandemic year in the calculation of activity levels in enabling free allocation to installations and allows for the relevant UK ETS authority to create a flexible share of allowances in addition to the annual cap. Other minor corrections to the Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading Scheme are also implemented by this order.

As the 2020 COVID-impacted scheme year was used in the calculation of change in activity levels for 2021, the Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading Scheme (Amendment) Order 2023 allows for operators whose free allocation of allowances was reduced by 2021 activity level changes process to apply for the allocation to be redetermined.

The Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading Scheme Regulations 2012 These regulations apply to England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland and implement Directive 2003/87/EC. In addition to this, following on from Directive 2009/29/EC being established, these regulations consolidate all previous sets of implementing regulations and require all operators under the EU ETS to monitor and report their emissions each year. These regulations have been amended several times. The most recent amendment was The Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading Scheme (Amendment No.3) Regulations 2019. These regulations came into force on 21 November 2019 and implement changes in the EU Emission Trading Scheme for phase for of the Emissions Cycle which will run from 2021 – 2030. In addition to this, the Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading Scheme (Amendment) Regulations 2020 amended this 2019 amendment by correcting errors and making additional amendments as a consequence of those errors.
The Merchant Shipping (Monitoring, Reporting and Verification of Carbon Dioxide Emissions) and the Port State Control (Amendment) Regulations SI 2017 These regulations apply in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland and create a system for monitoring and reporting carbon dioxide emissions from ships and reporting other information at national and EU level. This is in accordance with Regulation (EU) 2015/757.
The Merchant Shipping (Prevention of Air Pollution from Ships) and Motor Fuel (Composition and Content) (Amendment) Regulations 2014 Amendment of the Merchant Shipping (Prevention of Air Pollution from Ships) Regulations 2008 which came into force on 16 December 2014.
The Merchant Shipping (Prevention of Air Pollution from Ships) Regulations 2008

The Merchant Shipping (Prevention of Air Pollution from Ships) Regulations 2008 implement Annex VI in the UK. Some aspects of Annex VI are already in place including requirement for marine fuel oil suppliers to be registered and limits set on NOx emissions from marine diesel engines (including those on offshore installations). These Regulations came into force on 8 December 2008. These regulations were amended by The Merchant Shipping (Prevention of Air Pollution from Ships) (Miscellaneous Amendments) Regulations 2019 to introduce a provision for the requirement for ships > 400 gross tonnes to obtain an IEE certificate. The 2008 regulations were further amended by The Merchant Shipping (Prevention of Air Pollution from Ships) (Amendment) Regulations 2021, to implement limits on sulphur in fuels (0.5% by mass or less) and a requirement for all new engines to meet the latest NOx emission standards.

The Merchant Shipping (Prevention of Air Pollution from Ships) (Amendment) Regulations 2023 amends these regulations to implement changes made to Annex VI of the MARPOL Convention, including those related to energy efficiency and carbon intensity of ships.

Guidance on the Sulphur Oxide requirements under this legislation are available in MGN 400 (M+F) Amendment 1: Additional guidance on the Merchant Shipping (Prevention of Air Pollution from Ships) Regulations 2008 as amended by the Merchant Shipping (Prevention of Air Pollution from Ships) (Amendment) Regulations 2010.

The National Emission Ceilings Regulations 2018 These regulations set national ceilings and a requirement for the development of a reduction programme for sulphur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds, ammonia and fine particulate matter in the UK.
The Offshore Combustion Installations (Pollution Prevention and Control) Regulations 2013 The Offshore Pollution Prevention and Control (PPC) Regulations 2013 transpose the relevant provisions of the Industrial Emissions Directive 2010/75/EU in respect to specific atmospheric pollutants from combustion installations with a thermal capacity rating in excess of 50 MW on offshore platforms undertaking oil and gas production and gas and CO2 unloading and storage. In this context, the obligations of the Offshore PPC Regulations 2013 on the offshore oil and gas industry basically mirror those of the Offshore Combustion Installations PPC Regulations 2001 (as amended), which ceased to apply after 07 January 2014. This Instrument came into effect on 19 May 2013.
The Ozone-Depleting Substances Regulations 2015 These Regulations provide for the enforcement of EC Regulation 1005/2009 on substances that delete the ozone layer (as amended). The Regulations may be cited as the Ozone-Depleting Substances Regulations 2015 and came into force on 7 March 2015. These Regulations replace and consolidate the Ozone-Depleting Substances (Qualifications) Regulations 2009 and the Environmental Protection (Controls on Ozone-Depleting Substances) Regulations 2011.
The Petroleum (Current Model Clauses) Order 1999 An objective of the Petroleum Act 1998 is to conserve gas, a finite energy resource, by avoiding unnecessary wastage during the production of hydrocarbons from the UKCS. The actual Model Clause may vary depending on when the Block Licence was granted, but in recent licences flaring is covered by Paragraph 3 of Model Clause 21, and this states that the Licensee that not flare any gas from the licensed area or use gas for gas lift except with written consent. This Order came into effect on 15 February 1999.
The Petroleum Licensing (Exploration and Production) (Seaward and Landward Areas) Regulations 2004 These Regulations consolidate with amendments the provisions of the Petroleum (Production) Regulations 1982 (as amended) in relation to (a) applications to the Secretary of State for petroleum production licences in respect of seaward areas and (b) applications to the Secretary of State for petroleum exploration licences in respect of seaward areas and landward areas below the low water line. Petroleum Licensing (Exploration and Production) (Seaward and Landward Areas) Regulations 2004 entered into force on 5 March 2004. Petroleum Licensing (Production) (Seaward Areas) Regulation 2008 entered into force on 6 April 2008.
The Petroleum Licensing (Production) (Seaward Areas) Regulations 2008 These Regulations consolidate with amendments the provisions of the Petroleum (Production) Regulations 1982 (as amended) in relation to (a) applications to the Secretary of State for petroleum production licences in respect of seaward areas and (b) applications to the Secretary of State for petroleum exploration licences in respect of seaward areas and landward areas below the low water line. Petroleum Licensing (Exploration and Production) (Seaward and Landward Areas) Regulations 2004 entered into force on 5 March 2004. Petroleum Licensing (Production) (Seaward Areas) Regulation 2008 entered into force on 6 April 2008.
The Pollution Prevention and Control (Industrial Emissions) (Amendment) Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2014 Amends the Pollution Prevention and Control (PPC) (Industrial Emissions) Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2013. The 2013 regulations came into force on the 20 June 2013. With the 2014 amendment coming into force on the 10 December 2014. these regulations extend to Northern Ireland only. The PPC regulations cover onshore air emission activities in Northern Ireland.
The Pollution Prevention and Control (Scotland) Regulations 2012 The Pollution Prevention and Control (PPC) (Scotland) Regulations set out a system to control pollution from any installation or mobile plant carrying out specified activities through permits, inspections and control of emissions. The regulation covers the inclusion of best available techniques (BAT). These regulations came into force on 7 January 2013 and extend to Scotland only. The PPC regulations cover onshore air emission activities in Scotland.
The REACH etc (Amendment) Regulations 2021 These Regulations came into force on 30 September 2021 and apply to England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. They amend Retained Regulation 1907/2006 on the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (UK REACH) to ensure that the legislation operates effectively in the UK context.
The Sulphur Content of Liquid Fuels (Amendment) Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2014 This Regulation implements Directive 1999/32/EC in the UK setting maximum sulphur content for fuel including heavy fuel oil and gas oil including marine fuel. This Regulation replaced the 2000 and came into force on 31 May 2007 and is applicable to Northern Ireland only. The 2007 regulations were amended in 2014 in accordance with regulations 3 to 8. The 2014 amendment came into force on 18 June 2014.
The Sulphur Content of Liquid Fuels (England and Wales) (Amendment) Regulations 2014 This Regulation implements Directive 1999/32/EC in the UK setting maximum sulphur content for fuel including heavy fuel oil and gas oil including marine fuel. This Regulation came into force on 16 February 2007 and is applicable to England and Wales only. The 2007 regulations were amended in 2014 in accordance with regulations 3 to 9. The 2014 amendment came into force on 29 August 2014.
The Sulphur Content of Liquid Fuels (Scotland) Regulations 2014 This Regulation implements Directive 1999/32/EC in the UK setting maximum sulphur content for fuel including heavy fuel oil and gas oil including marine fuel. This Regulation replaced the 2000 and came into force on 13 November 2014 and is applicable to Scotland only.